History

Anzac Memorial, Hyde Park, Sydney | Sydney

This memorial, to perpetuate the memory of the men and women of New South Wales who served in the first World War, was built from the proceeds of public subscription and a State Government grant. The structure is 100 metres high, its exterior being finished in red granite and the interior in New South Wales white marble. On the main approach is the Lake of Reflections bordered by poplar trees. O...

Anzac War Memorial, Anzac Square | Brisbane

The Anzac War Memorial is in the heart of the city, overlooking a small park below Central Railway Station. The memorial is an open colonnade supporting an entablature of stone and bronze. On the inner face are inscribed the names of battles in which Australian soldiers have fought, and in the centre of the circle of columns is a bronze urn upon which burns the never dying "Flame of Remembrance". ...

Argyle Place, Observatory Park | Sydney

Argyle Place, a delightful corner of old Sydney, lies below Observatory Park. Through Argyle Cut, the Argyle Arts Centre in the old bond store offers an intriguing spot to linger; you can shop as well as watch craftsmen at work on silverware, copperware, leather goods, pottery, stained glass, and art enamels. For dinner you might try the Argyle Tavern on Argyle Street. Church of the Holy Trinit...

Botanic Gardens, Macquarrie Street, Sydney | Sydney

The Botanic Gardens are located on the site of the first government farm, established by Governor Phillip in 1816. A succession of botanists later developed the three distinct areas of the gardens along scientific lines with collections of rare plants and trees. The upper garden was the site of the international exhibition of 1879 and purpose landscaped in Victorian style with statues and formal w...

Captain Cook's Cottage, Fitzroy Gardens | Melbourne

This cottage of brick and stone was originally the home of Captain Cook's parents at Great Ayton, Yorkshire. It was purchased for the State of Victoria by Mr Russell Grimwade in 1933, brought from England, and re-erected in Fitzroy Gardens. The ivy on the walls is grown from a slip of the original ivy from Great Ayton. The Union Jack, which is sometimes flown from the flagpole, is as old as the c...

Elizabeth Farm, 70 Alice St., Rosehill | Rosehill

Elizabeth Farm House, with its deep shady verandas and restful grounds, is a rare example of an early Australian colonial bungalow. Commenced in 1793, it was built for John and Elizabeth Macarthur, pioneers of the Australian wool industry. Elizabeth Farm is situated in a re-created 1830s garden and reflects the architectural ideas of the colony’s first 50 years. There are no inhibiting room b...

Flagstaff Gardens, King Street | Melbourne

Melbourne's oldest public gardens were laid out in the 1840s. A plaque marks the site of the old signal which announced the arrival of ships at Williamstown.

Fort Denison (1913), Sydney Harbour | Sydney

Fort Denison Lighthouse sits on top of the beautiful Martello Tower of Fort Denison. The Fort was built in 1850 in response to the then fears of a Russian invasion. Also known as pinch gut, an infamous name given to the island by convicts chained to the former rocky outcrop and deprived of food. A supply ship called at the fort once a week, and the prison's meager food rations earned it the sobriq...

Government House, The Domain, Hobart | Hobart

Government House overlooks the Derwent River and adjoins the Botanical Gardens. The House was erected in 1858 during the period of exceptional prosperity which succeeded the discovery of gold in Victoria. The clock in the tower was the first public clock brought to Tasmania.

Lands Department Building, Sydney | Sydney

Located at corner of Macquarie and Bridge Streets the Lands Department Building was constructed between 1877 and 1890 and is arguably the best example of the work of colonial architect James Barnet. Built with beautifully consistent honey coloured sandstone the building yields a magnificent glow in the morning sun. Decorative carvings of early Australian explorers adorn the facade.

Matthew Flinders | Sydney

Matthew Flinders (1774 to 1814). In his short life of 40 years the accomplishments of Matthew Flinders are simply overwhelming. At age 15 he joined the Royal Navy, serving under Captain William Bligh, a future governor of New South Wales. After arriving in Sydney in 1795 his first expedition travelled southward from Port Jackson to Botany Bay, which had earlier been entirely surveyed in 1770 by Ca...

Melville Street, Church | Hobart

The main centre of Methodism in Hobart is the Melville Street Church, the foundation-stone of which was laid by Sir John Franklin in 1837. The church, copied from the Wesleyan Chapel, London, was opened in 1840.

Observatory Hill, The Rocks, Sydney | Sydney

Observatory Hill was once the site of a stone fort constructed by Governor Phillip. The observatory was erected in 1858 with a tall central tower and a corner structure topped with a revolving dome housing a large telescope. A ball on the staff of the tower once dropped at 1 o'clock each day to provide exact time to harbour shipping.

Observatory, Wickham Terrace, Brisbane | Brisbane

There are few buildings in Brisbane that recall so vividly the early life of the settlement as the old Observatory, which stands in a corner of Albert Park at the top of Wickham Terrace. It was erected by convict labour in 1829 as a windmill, with ponderous wooden sails to provide power to grind the convict-grown maize and wheat. Because of some defect, however, the windmill refused to work. Since...

Old Melbourne Gaol, Cnr Russell and La Trobe streets | Melbourne

Old Melbourne Gaol, now an interactive museum, is the site where 136 people, including the notorious bushranger Ned Kelly, were hanged. The Old Melbourne Gaol – Crime and Justice Experience includes a visit to the Old Melbourne Gaol, the former City Watch House and Old Magistrate’s Court. The prison was also a focus during some of Australia’s most significant historical moments, including...

Old Treasury Building, Spring Street, Treasury Gardens | Melbourne

The treasury building is one of Melbourne's handsomest public buildings, it was erected from 1859 to 1862 and is an excellent example of Italian Renaissance.

Parliament House, Brisbane | Brisbane

The construction of Parliament House commenced in 1865 to a design by colonial architect Giles Tiffin. The large renaissance-style building features impressive mansard roofs, domed over a central block and tapered at the end wings. Located at the south-western end of the Botanic Gardens or can be approached along Alice Street.

Parliament House, Corner Spring and Bourke Streets | Melbourne

An Act of the Imperial Parliament, passed in the year 1850, decreed "that the district of Port Phillip should be separated from the Colony of New South Wales and should be named and designated as the Colony of Victoria", having a separate Legislative Council. But not until 1855, when the daily discoveries of gold and the rapid progress of the State were exalting public ideas, was a start made on t...

Public Library, William Street, Brisbane | Brisbane

This is one of the finest buildings in Brisbane. The free treatment of the Renaissance style gives grace to a design dignified by the Corinthian columns which form the distinctive feature of the facade. Built as a museum, it was converted to its present use in 1902, when the first free Public Library of Queensland was established. The John Oxley Memorial Library of Australian literature and histor...

Royal Mint, William Street | Melbourne

The Melbourne Mint, a branch of the British Royal Mint, was established by order of Council on 10th August 1869, and it was opened on 12th January 1872 to meet the problems created by the large discoveries of gold in Australia. Nowadays the Mint does not produce gold coins, and has become the Hellenic Museum. From the closing down of the Sydney Mint in 1926, the Royal Melbourne Mint became the m...